Recreational Opportunities

BEACH COMBING & TIDE POOLING

The rocks at the south end of the ocean beach provide spectacular tide pooling opportunities during low tide.  Consult tide chart for low tide times during visit.  Please leave all living creatures in the tide pools for all to see.  Tread lightly and avoid damaging barnacles and rock habitats.  Do not enter caves, climb on rock cliffs or stand near unstable cliffs.
Beach Safety Guidelines:

  • Never turn your back on the ocean.
  • Watch out for sneaker waves.
  • Stay alert for logs being washed in by large waves.
  • Never climb on driftwood to avoid incoming tidal waters.
  • Westwind strongly recommends no ocean or river swimming: the water is dangerously cold, subject to strong rip currents and can be very unpredictable.

HIKING

High Meadow Trail:  A one-mile trail that originates at the top of the Highlands Unit leads along the cliffs to Lost Lake, High Meadow and Agate Cove.  This trail provides spectacular views of the ocean, and High Meadow is particularly suited for whale and sunset watching.  The trail is very steep in places and can be slick.  Moderate difficulty.

Rainforest Trail:  A two-mile trail (graveled emergency roadway) begins at the NE corner of the lodge, featuring spectacular views of the estuary and some of the biggest trees at Westwind.  If you explore far enough, you reach a pasture and two houses (occupied by Site Managers).  The trail is a beginner’s trail – gradual slopes.

Wysong Corridor:  This trail links the High Meadow and Rainforest trails and travels through a unique patch of Douglas Fir.

Estuary Trail:  The estuary trail travels along the northern Westwind boundary parallel to the Salmon River.  This trail is often muddy due to tides.  It is not unusual to see bald eagles, blue herons, and killdeer.  In the early morning or evening you may also spot raccoons or deer.

CANOES AND KAYAKS:

Boats are not available from the Westwind Stewardship Group.  Several local companies can arrange trips for your group.  Groups opting to supply their own boats do so at their own risk.

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